Orange County DUI Statistics

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Tag Archives: orange county dui statistics

Orange County DUI Statistics

Orange County DUI Statistics

Orange County DUI Statistics

Orange County DUI Statistics are available and accurate mainly because DUI arrests are fairly well documented.  Police reports go to both the DMV and the prosecutor’s office for filing of charges with the court, and the DMV keeps track of what charges are entered on the person’s record once the case reaches a disposition (trial, settlement, or DUI dismissal).

orange county dui

Orange County DUI Statistics – not the highest for DUI

The overall highest per capita rate for DUI is San Diego, which is not a surprise.  San Diego has a number of colleges and Universities, and is close to the Mexico border – the five miles of the Interstate 5 Freeway coming from Tijuana into the USA is the five mile stretch of roadway with the highest rate of DUI in the entire country.

For Orange County specifically, using the data from the California Office of Traffic Safety reveals the cities that are highest for DUI in California, and in Orange County.

Looking at Orange County DUI statistics, of course larger cities would typically have higher rates of DUI.  Looking at statistics and viewing them per capita controls for population and provides the true Orange County DUI Statistics.

Orange County DUI Statistics – Not the Highest DUI Death Rate

The in conducting the analysis of alcohol-related fatalities based off statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), it was discovered that the following U.S. cities had the highest fatality rates, per capita. (Note: NHTSA statistics deem an accident to be “alcohol-related” if a driver had a blood alcohol concentration of .08% or greater, which is above the legal limit to operate a motor vehicle.)
  1. San Bernardino, CA
  2. Mobile, AL
  3. Riverside, CA
  4. Tulsa, OK
  5. Lubbock, TX
  6. Knoxville, TN
  7. Fresno, CA
  8. Spokane, WA
  9. Sacramento, CA
  10. Little Rock, AR
San Bernardino had the highest alcohol-related fatality rate by far. From 2010-2012, there were 92 fatal auto accidents involving drunk drivers. With a population of more than 210,000, San Bernardino’s DUI fatality rate (collisions per 1,000 residents) came in at 0.4368, nearly six times the national average of 0.0731.
Men still dominate DUI arrests and fatalities. In 2010, males accounted for some 77.6 percent of DUI arrests in California. But according to the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs (CDAP), the proportion of females among convicted DUI offenders has risen consistently every year since 1989.

Orange County DUI Statistics show a problem in The OC.

Despite a very active law-enforcement presence and consistent prosecution by the district attorney’s office, Orange County has one of the worst drunk-driving problems in California. According to the California Office of Traffic Safety, 10 Orange County cities rank among the worst in the state for rates of injuries and fatalities caused by DUI. Of all California cities with a population between 100,000 and 250,000, Orange ranks No. 1 for drunken driving fatalities and collisions. Santa Ana and Anaheim rank No. 3 and No. 10, respectively, among cities with more than 250,000 people.
DUIs in Newport Beach make it No. 1 for cities with populations between 50,000 and 100,000. Yet it’s not for lack of enforcement; Newport Beach police arrested more than 650 people for suspected DUI in 2011.
CHP statistics from 2010 show that Orange County ranked second only to Los Angeles County in the state for DUI deaths and injury collisions. During that year, there were more than 1,000 DUI-related injury collisions in Orange County, more than in either San Diego or San Bernardino counties. The arrest rate is quickly growing among young people in college towns. Fullerton DUIs, for example, went from fifth in DUI arrests of drivers younger than 21 in 2009 to first in 2010.
Arrests for driving under the influence dived nearly 26 percent in Orange County from their peak in 2008 through 2013, according to the most recent figures from the state. That’s just a bit better than California overall, which saw DUI arrests fall 25 percent over the same period.
Accidents involving impaired drivers did not plunge as dramatically, however. The number of crashes resulting in death or injury in O.C. fell from a peak of 462 in 2005 to 359 in 2011 to 401 in 2012 – 13 percent in all. In California overall, such crashes fell 24 percent from their peak in 2003.
Fullerton’s lively downtown bar scene helped produce 721 DUI arrests through November 2014, compared with 623 through November of this year, said Fullerton Police Chief Dan Hughes.
Santa Ana had 807 DUI arrests last year, and 704 through the first week of December this year, said Corporal Anthony Bertagna.
In Fountain Valley, there were 201 DUI arrests in 2014 and 135 in 2015, with just days left to go, Llorens said.
In Cypress, arrests fell from 56 in 2014 to 27 through November.
Irvine logged a drop in Irvine DUI arrests from 594 in 2013 to 531 in 2014 to about 410 to date this year.
Costa Mesa saw arrests dive by more than half in 2014.
Westminster’s DUI arrests totaled 255 in 2013, 254 in 2014 and 230 through the first week of December, said Deputy Chief Dan Schoonmaker.
Some cities reported more DUI arrests. Anaheim’s DUI arrests ticked up, from 555 in 2014 to 563 to date in 2015, said Sgt. Daron Wyatt.
Newport Beach, Tustin and Brea had arrested more people through November of this year than they had in all of 2014, officials said.
Newport Beach and Orange had the state’s highest rates of crashes in which at least one driver had been drinking, when compared to other California cities their size. Fullerton and Laguna Hills had the worst rates of crashes that involved underage drinkers.
2009 COLLLISION
VICTIMS
KILLED &
INJURED
OTS RANKING
Total Fatal and Injury
18,867
13/58
Alcohol Involved
1,951
32/58
Had Been Drinking Driver < 21
179
38/58
Had Been Drinking Driver 21 – 34
638
52/58
2014 TYPE OF COLLISION
VICTIMS
KILLED &
INJURED
OTS RANKING
Total Fatal and Injury
19,873
8/58
Alcohol Involved
1,998
16/58
Had Been Drinking Driver < 21
97
51/58
Had Been Drinking Driver 21 – 34
743
28/58

Statistics of total overall California DUI Arrests

  • 75 percent of DUI arrestees were male.
  • 43 percent were Latino.
  • 42 percent were white.
  • 53.6 percent were age 30 or younger.
  • 0.5 percent were under 18.
  • 0.4 percent were older than 71.
  • 37 percent of those involved in crashes that killed or injured were drunk; 39 percent were high on drugs.

Source: the California DMV annual report.

For Orange County, last year there were over 97% of DUIs that were misdemeanors.  Less than 3% of DUIs were felony DUI cases.

Contact us now – Let’s Get Started.

Don’t delay contacting us.  We can start you on a plan of action today that will help your court date later. The DMV needs action within 10 days of your arrest.  Contact us today.

 

DUI Checkpoint in Santa Ana Planned

DUI Checkpoint in Santa Ana Planned

Our Orange County DUI Lawyers have learned that the Santa Ana Police Department has a DUI Checkpoint in Santa Ana Planned for tonight, as an Orange County DUI Checkpoint.

Police will be conducting a DUI/Drivers License checkpoint tonight, Friday, July 17th, 2015.

It will begin at 9:00PM and is scheduled to conclude at 3:00AM, and it will be conducted in the area of 1500 E. McFadden Avenue, in the City of Santa Ana.

Be safe and plan ahead.

English: The Santa Ana Police Department and J...

Another Orange County DUI Checkpoint tonight, courtesy of the Santa Ana Police Department.

Why does law enforcement have Orange County DUI Checkpoints?

DUI Checkpoints are even admitted by law enforcement to be less effective than other means of removing drunk drivers from the road. But, even though DUI checkpoints don’t work, police state they had a deterrent effect preventing people from driving in the first place.  The truth is that funding in grants from the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS), MADD, and the Federal Government ensure DUI checkpoints are used first before other measures.

Are DUI Checkpoints legal?

The US Supreme Court, as well as the law in California, makes DUI checkpoints legal, as long as they follow certain criteria, including:

  • Decision making by supervisors: This is important to ensure that checkpoints aren’t set up in “arbitrary and capricious” locations. The court didn’t say so, but we’re guessing they wanted to avoid any accusations of racial profiling.
  • Limits on discretion of field officers: The theme of distrust of the officer continues. Strict procedures and a random selection of drivers according to a preset pattern (every third driver, for example) are suggested to avoid abuse.
  • Maintenance of safety conditions: We’re not sure how it applies to constitutionality, but the court wanted lots of bright lights and signs.
  • Reasonable location: The location should be based on relevant factors, such as areas with high incidences of DUI or DUI accidents.
  • Time and duration: There are no hard and fast rules, but the timing should be set to optimize the effectiveness of the checkpoint. In other words, put ’em up when the drunks are out.
  • Indicia of official nature of roadblock: This is more babble about bright lights and warning signs. They do mention that the lights and signage should be visible for the sake of notification to the drivers. Drivers also can’t be pulled over for avoiding the checkpoint, unless they violate a law to do so.
  • Length and nature of detention: The time of the stop should be minimized as to infringe on a person’s rights as little as possible. That means peek at the eyes, smell for booze, and look for cans. If there are no signs of intoxication, the driver should be let go. If they look or smell drunk, field sobriety tests are appropriate.
  • Advance publicity: Ingersoll was in favor of advance publicity. It referred to the deterrent effect and stated that the notice minimizes intrusiveness to a person’s rights. In 1993, the court in People v. Banks stated that publicity was not a requirement, but it certainly helps.

Contact us

Contact our firm if you have any questions about Orange County DUI Checkpoints.  We can help you.

Irvine DUI Checkpoint announced for June 12, 2015

English: Freeway onramp to the 405 North at Ja...

DUI checkpoint near this onramp to the 405 North at Jamboree Road.

Another Orange County DUI Checkpoint, an Irvine DUI Checkpoint announced for June 12, 2015, was announced as an OC DUI Checkpoint. The Irvine Police Department have announced a DUI checkpoint to be conducted tomorrow, Friday, June 12, 2015, from 8:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. in the area of Jamboree Road and Michelson Drive. That area is near Houston’s, The Daily Dose, and is near the Daily Grill, The Melting Pot, on one side of the 405, and Andrei’s on the other.

Our Irvine DUI Lawyers learned about the DUI checkpoint from a press release issued by Irvine PD – they stated that they wanted publicity for this DUI checkpoint to deter drunk driving in the City of Irvine.

Are DUI Checkpoints Legal?

As most people know, DUI checkpoints are roadblocks that law enforcement officers set up on roads for the purpose of catching people driving under the influence of alcohol. Some of us also think they are used to generate revenue for police departments and the State, since the stops often result in citizens being slapped with minor (finable) offenses. Of course, civil asset forfeiture laws allow the police to seize vehicles and share impound fees between the police and  has been implemented during these stops as well.

In California, the Ingersoll decision sets up the legality of DUI checkpoints in CA, but also the requirements for them to be legal.

Twelve states do not conduct sobriety checkpoints because they prohibit them by state law or their interpretation of state Constitution. If you live in, or are driving through, any of these 12 states, you won’t have to worry about encountering entrapment checkpoints:

  • Alaska,
  • Idaho,
  • Iowa,
  • Michigan,
  • Minnesota,
  • Montana,
  • Oregon,
  • Rhode Island,
  • Texas,
  • Washington,
  • Wisconsin, and
  • Wyoming.

Interestingly, many of the 38 states that DO conduct checkpoints do so under the belief that they are “upheld” under the federal Constitution. Washington, D.C. also allows them for that reason.

And, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that in the case of DUI checkpoints, our Fourth Amendment rights don’t apply. That court found that the state’s interest in reducing drunk driving outweighs the “minor infringement” on a driver’s Constitutional rights.

Certain requirements for “Constitutional” checkpoints do apply, though.  In California, the Ingersoll decision applies:

In order for the checkpoints to be Constitutional there must be clear guidelines that are carefully followed by the legal authorities. Additionally, the Court has left it up to each individual state to develop these guidelines. In California, for example, the state supreme court has held that the decisions about where to set up sobriety checkpoints and about which cars to stop (i.e. every car, every sixth car, etc) must be made by supervisors prior to officers setting up the checkpoints. The sites selected should be in areas that have a high incidence of drunk driving and the length of each stop should be minimized. (source)

Contact us Today.

If you have questions about an Irvine DUI checkpoint, or were arrested for DUI in Orange County, contact our DUI Defense Law Firm today.  We can help you and give you an honest assessment of your case.

Don’t delay contacting us.  We can start you on a plan of action today that will help your court date later. The DMV needs action within 10 days of your arrest.  Contact us today.

Orange County DUI Checkpoints This Weekend (May 29, 2015)

English: Newport Beach Triangle Point photo D ...

Newport Beach DUI Checkpoint announced (photo D Ramey)

Orange County DUI Checkpoints This Weekend (May 29, 2015)

Two DUI checkpoints have been announced this weekend, according to the Orange County Register and other sources. Orange County DUI Checkpoints This Weekend (May 29, 2015) are as follows:

A Newport Beach DUI checkpoint will take place, operated by the Newport Beach Police Department, on Friday, May 29th, from 8pm to 2:00 a.m., at a currently undisclosed location. Most previous checkpoints have been on Northbound Jamboree Road, near Santa Barbara Avenue.

Another DUI Checkpoint, in Orange, will take place on the same date (May 29th) near the Outlets of Orange (previously called The Block in Orange), on The City Drive, between the 22 offramp, and Lampson, from the hours of 9pm and 3:00 a.m.

WHY DOES LAW ENFORCEMENT HAVE ORANGE COUNTY DUI CHECKPOINTS?

DUI Checkpoints are even admitted by law enforcement to be less effective than other means of removing drunk drivers from the road. But, even though DUI checkpoints don’t work, police state they had a deterrent effect preventing people from driving in the first place.  The truth is that funding in grants from the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS), MADD, and the Federal Government ensure DUI checkpoints are used first before other measures.

ARE DUI CHECKPOINTS LEGAL?

The US Supreme Court, as well as the law in California, makes DUI checkpoints legal, as long as they follow certain criteria, including:

  • Decision making by supervisors: This is important to ensure that checkpoints aren’t set up in “arbitrary and capricious” locations. The court didn’t say so, but we’re guessing they wanted to avoid any accusations of racial profiling.
  • Limits on discretion of field officers: The theme of distrust of the officer continues. Strict procedures and a random selection of drivers according to a preset pattern (every third driver, for example) are suggested to avoid abuse.
  • Maintenance of safety conditions: We’re not sure how it applies to constitutionality, but the court wanted lots of bright lights and signs.
  • Reasonable location: The location should be based on relevant factors, such as areas with high incidences of DUI or DUI accidents.
  • Time and duration: There are no hard and fast rules, but the timing should be set to optimize the effectiveness of the checkpoint. In other words, put ’em up when the drunks are out.
  • Indicia of official nature of roadblock: This is more babble about bright lights and warning signs. They do mention that the lights and signage should be visible for the sake of notification to the drivers. Drivers also can’t be pulled over for avoiding the checkpoint, unless they violate a law to do so.
  • Length and nature of detention: The time of the stop should be minimized as to infringe on a person’s rights as little as possible. That means peek at the eyes, smell for booze, and look for cans. If there are no signs of intoxication, the driver should be let go. If they look or smell drunk, field sobriety tests are appropriate.
  • Advance publicity: Ingersoll was in favor of advance publicity. It referred to the deterrent effect and stated that the notice minimizes intrusiveness to a person’s rights. In 1993, the court in People v. Banks stated that publicity was not a requirement, but it certainly helps.

Contact us now – Let’s Get Started.

Don’t delay contacting us.  We can start you on a plan of action today that will help your court date later. The DMV needs action within 10 days of your arrest.  Contact us today.